See also

William MURRAY ( - )

1. William MURRAY was the son of Sir Patrick 2nd MURRAY 2nd Lord Elibank (bef1628-1661) and Lady Elizabeth STEWART ( - ).

 

He was one of the gentlemen of His Majesty's troop of guards.

Second Generation

2. Sir Patrick 2nd MURRAY 2nd Lord Elibank, son of Sir Patrick 1st MURRAY 1st Lord Elibank of Ettrick Forest and Elizabeth DUNDAS of Arniston, was born before 1628. He had the title '2nd Lord Elibank'. He married Elizabeth STEWART on 9 April 1643 in Aberlady. He died on [Julian] 13 February 1661 in Aberlady.

 

He joined Montrose and was fined 20,000 Marks by a Committee of Parliament in 1646. Like his father, the second Earl was an enthusiastic royalist.

"He was but forty when he died, but it is not difficult to imagine that the son-in-law of Traquair, ruined by the ruin of the Royal cause, would meet with little sympathy in the country under the iron heel of Cromwell and dominated for the moment by the triumphant Covenant" - Mahon "Life of General the Hon. James Murray".

The fathers of both parents were good friends and political allies. Elizabeth's father succeeded Patrick's grandfather Gideon as Treasurer Depute, and in general there were many things that made bringing their families together through marriage a natural turn of events.

Nothing much else is known about the second Earl's life.

 

3. Lady Elizabeth STEWART, daughter of Sir John STEWART 1st Earl of Traquair and Catherine CARNEGIE, had the title 'Lady'. She died.

 

"in whose veins was the blood of successive Kings of England (with the exception of Richard I - from Henry II down to Edward III, and through her paternal grandmother the blood of Kings of Scotland from Robert the Bruce to James II"

One of the most important developments of the last 50 years in religious studies has been the emergence of suppressed and forgotten texts and lore. A flood of new archeological knowledge and newly discovered ancient texts sheds unexpected light on the traditions of Christian worship. Into this flood, Gardner, who holds the office of the Jacobite Historiographer Royal of the Royal House of Stewart, would like to inject yet another revelation: the bloodline of Jesus Christ. According to Gardner, Jesus married Mary Magdalene, and she was pregnant with his child when he was crucified at Qumran, not Golgotha as it is usually thought. Mary delivered a male child before she and her son were spirited out of Palestine to France, where she died. This child became the scion of an amazing genealogy that terminates (surprise!) in the House of Stuart. Furthermore, that house did not expire but flourishes to this day. This book is an amazing patchwork of scholarly trappings and dizzy tomfoolery stitched together with myth and fable until it fabricates the amazing argument that indeed the Crown of England properly belongs to the Line of David through Jesus Christ himself. This is exhilarating fantasy worthy of a great romantic novel.

 

Patrick 2nd MURRAY and Elizabeth STEWART had the following children:

 

John MURRAY (c. 1649- ). John was born circa 1649. He was baptised on 20 December 1649 in Liberton, Midlothian. He was a Captain in the Army.

Patrick 3rd MURRAY (bef1661-1687). Patrick was born before 1661. He had the title 'Master of Elibank, 3rd Lord Elibank'. He married Anna BURNET on 20 August 1674. He died in 1687.

1

William MURRAY ( - )

Catherine MURRAY (bap.1644). Catherine was baptised in June 1644.

Elizabeth MURRAY (bap.1645). Elizabeth was baptised in April 1645 in Aberlady.

Margaret MURRAY (bap.1646). Margaret was baptised on 9 August 1646 in Innerleithen, Peebles.

Henrietta MURRAY ( - )

Helen MURRAY (bur.1691). Helen married Patrick MURRAY on 1 June 1681. She was buried on 17 December 1691 in Greyfriars, Edinburgh.

Third Generation

4. Sir Patrick 1st MURRAY 1st Lord Elibank of Ettrick Forest, son of Sir Gideon MURRAY and Margaret PENTLAND, was born circa 1608. He had the title 'Nova Scotia Baronet, Keeper of Caerlaverock, 1st Lord Elibank of Ettrick Forest'. He was a MP for Haddington. He married Margaret HAMILTON on 21 August 1610. He married Elizabeth DUNDAS on [Julian] 24 January 1617. He married Helen LINDSAY on [Julian] 16 January 1628. He married Agnes NICOLSON on 11 December 1636. He died on 12 November 1648. He was buried in "In his aisle at Aberlady Kirk, East Lothian".. He was buried in his aisle in Aberlady Kirk. He married Katherine WEIR.

 

Patrick Murray was brought up in difficult times, when Scotland was clearly divided by religious strife, but Patrick followed his father as an out-and-out loyalist to the crown. As early as 1615 King James bestowed a pension on him for "true and faithful" service", but it is not known exactly what he had done thus to please the monarch. At the Session of the Estates, held in 1621, which ratified the famous Five Articles (which attempted to force the Scottish people to accept episcopalianism, in line with England and against the wishes of so many Scots) Murray, now Sir Patrick, voted with the majority to carry the motion, and no doubt subsequently enthusiastically supported the upholding of the Articles. In 1628, the year in which the king's action to resume the Church revenues came before the Estates, Sir Patrick was made a (Nova Scotia) baronet, doubtless for his continuing support for the king in what were proving unpopular measures. Apart from its unpopularity amonst Presbyterians, a large amount of families who had previously been granted church lands had no intention of giving them up without a struggle.

One of Patrick's jobs was as keeper of one of the king's properties, Caerlaverock (near Carlisle). He was also "knight, shireff principall of the shiredome of Handintoun (Haddington) for the yeere to come, and conveener of the justices of the peace within the said shirefdome".

Patrick Murray was politically and personally linked to John Stuart, 1st Earl of Traquair: they were both ardent royalists. Traquair was descended from both English (through his father) and Scottish (through his mother) royalty, and this helped to shape his political opinions and loyalties. Traquair (like Sir Patrick Murray) was thus involved in the persecution of Presbyterians by King Charles. Proud of his character which did not like to do things in half measures, he said: "I sal either mak the service be read heir in Edinburgh or I sal perishe by the way. Nothing proves more prejudiciall to your Majesty's service than to prosecute your commandments in a half or halting way... from that sect (the Presbyterians) I have seldom found any motioun proceid but such as did smell of sedition and mutiny". The proud Scottish people were not going to be bulldozed into this against their will! Traquair and Murray were also connected because the former took the post of Treasurer-Depute for Scotland following the latter's father Gideon's death. The political link was cemented by a family one when Sir Patrick Murray's son (also Patrick) married Traquair's daughter Elizabeth. It is interesting to note at this stage, and in connection with the religious battles raging at the time, that Sir Patrick's grandson married Anne Burnet, daughter of the celebrated churchman Alexander Burnet, who also so persecuted Presbyterians, and whose most famous remark was that "the only way to deal with a fanatic (by which he meant anyone with religious views that diverged from his own) is to starve him". Burnet had, incidentally, started his career as chaplain and tutor in the house of ... Lord Traquair.

In 1643 Sir Patrick was raised to the peerage of Scotland as Lord Elibank of Ettrick Forest, in consideration of his "worth, prudence and sufficiency, and of the many worthy services done to His Majesty, our late dearest Father in his Council, Session and Exchequer by the late Gideon Murray". In addition, Murray had provided further practical assistance to the royal cause by providing a troop of horse which accompanied the Scots convoy sent to Oxford (where the king held government).

Four years later, Lord Elibank was one of only six peers who opposed handing over King Charles to the English Parliament. Both he and Traquair were 100% involved, and later, as one might expect, paid the price. Throughout this whole period Lord Elibank was lending the King large sums of money.

Elibank was perhaps more fortunate than Traquair, who lived to see his estates taken from him: he died just before this happened, leaving his son, Patrick, 2nd Lord Elibank, aged 12 at the time, to oversee the family's demise. This happened finally in 1658, and two years later, at the age of only 40, under the iron rule of Cromwell where his royalist sympathies were of no advantage to him, and also as the son-in-law of the fallen Lord Traquair, he himself died.

 

Margaret HAMILTON and Patrick 1st MURRAY had the following children:

 

John MURRAY ( - )

Christian MURRAY ( - ). Christian married George DOUGLAS in 1631.

 

Helen LINDSAY and Patrick 1st MURRAY had the following children:

 

Walter MURRAY ( -1695). Walter died in 1695.

George MURRAY ( -1702). George married Margaret MONCREIFFE in 1667. He died in 1702.

Helen MURRAY ( - )

 

Agnes NICOLSON and Patrick 1st MURRAY had the following children:

 

Thomas MURRAY (1637-c. 1659). Thomas was born on [Julian] 12 November 1637. He died circa 1659.

 

5. Elizabeth DUNDAS of Arniston, daughter of Sir James DUNDAS of Arniston, died before 19 May 1627. She and Patrick 1st MURRAY had the following children:

 

2

Patrick 2nd MURRAY (bef1628-1661)

William MURRAY ( -1684). William died on [Julian] 17 August 1684.

Elizabeth MURRAY ( - ). Elizabeth married Archibald STIRLING on 1 August 1637.

Agnes MURRAY ( - ). Agnes married George AUCHINLECK on 6 January 1643.

Jean MURRAY ( - ). Jean married William MURRAY on 3 February 1644.

Isobel MURRAY ( - )

 

6. Sir John STEWART 1st Earl of Traquair, son of John STEWART and Margaret STEWART, was born circa 1600. He had the title '1st Earl of Traquair'. He was a Lord High Treasurer to Charles I. He died on 27 March 1659. He married Catherine CARNEGIE.

 

John Stuart, whose portrait hangs in the Dining Room of Traquair, received an Earldom from Charles I in 1633, and in 1636 was made Lord High Treasurer. As, Treasurer Depute, he succeeded Sir Gideon Murray in that post. He built an additional story to the house and undertook the formidable task of diverting the River Tweed away from the House (the Well Pool outside the Brew House indicates its original course)

The first Earl's political fortunes rose and fell. He was dismissed from his post as Treasurer and Commissioner to the General assembly in 1641, and fined and confined to his estates , then readmitted to Parliament on the intervention of Charles I in 1646. In 1648 he was captured at the Civil War Battle of Preston while trying to rescue the king from the Parliamentarians. After 4 years imprisonment in Warwick Castle he was released to live out his last years at Traquair.

"John Stuart was a man of extraordinary natural parts, which were greatly improved by a liberal education, of remarkable steadiness and integrity, of great learning, a consummate statesman, and invariably attached to the interest of the royal family, on which account he afterwards suffered great and many hardships" (Peerage of Scotland)

According to Mahon (Life of General the Hon. James Murray) Traquair lived to see his estates passed into other hands, and died in absolute poverty, even starvation, as a result of his former support for Charles I.

 

John Stuart received an Earldom from Charles I in 1633, and in 1636 was made Lord High Treasurer. As Treasurer Depute, he succeeded his relation Sir Gideon Murray in that post. The first Earl's political fortunes rose and fell. He was dismissed from his post as Treasurer and Commissioner to the General assembly in 1641, and fined and confined to his estates, then readmitted to Parliament on the intervention of Charles I in 1646. In 1648 he was captured at the Civil War Battle of Preston while trying to rescue the king from the Parliamentarians. After 4 years imprisonment in Warwick Castle he was released to live out his last years at Traquair. "John Stuart was a man of extraordinary natural parts, which were greatly improved by a liberal education, of remarkable steadiness and integrity, of great learning, a consummate statesman, and invariably attached to the interest of the royal family, on which account he afterwards suffered great and many hardships" Traquair lived to see his estates passed into other hands, and died in absolute poverty, even starvation, as a result of his former support for Charles I.

 

7. Catherine CARNEGIE was the daughter of Sir David CARNEGIE 1st Earl of Southesk and Margaret LINDSAY. She and John STEWART had the following children:

 

3

Elizabeth STEWART ( - )