See also

Ann MURRAY ( -1843)

1. Ann MURRAY, daughter of Sir Patrick MURRAY 5th Lord Elibank (1703-1778) and Mary MORTLOCK ( - ), was born in Guildford, Surrey. She died on 6 May 1843 in Florence.

 

She was unmarried, and is buried with her sister in the Protestant Cemetery of Florence.

Second Generation

2. Sir Patrick MURRAY 5th Lord Elibank, son of Alexander MURRAY 4th Lord Elibank and Elizabeth STIRLING, was born on 27 February 1703. He had the title '5th Lord Elibank, Earl of Westminster'. He married Margaretta Maria DE JONGE in 1735. He died on 3 August 1778 in Ballencrieff Castle in Haddingtonshire near Edinburgh.. He married Mary MORTLOCK.

 

Sir Patrick was a wit, raconteur and friend of Dr. Johnson. He succeeded to the title as 5th Lord, and was also Lieutenant-Colonel in Wynyards Marines. He was a sometime member of the Cocoa Tree Club and The Poker Club.

Besides this, he was a Jacobite who had an involvement with the Elibank plot. "There was to be one more serious conspiracy against King George and his government, the Elibank Plot, which was penetrated and exploded in 1753 by the government led by Henry Pelham, heir to Walpole. The debacle cost the life of the last Jacobite martyr, Dr. Archie Cameron, younger brother to Lochiel, but really by 1753 Prince Charles, despite an expedient conversion to Anglicanism, was not politically viable".




A brilliant man of great knowledge Sir Patrick wrote Essays on Paper Money, Banking, etc. (1755) Thoughts on Money, Circulation, and Paper Currency (1758), Inquiry into the Origin and Consequence of the Public Debts (1758/9), Queries Relating to the Proposed Plan for Altering Entails in Scotland (1765), Letter to Lord Hailes on his Remarks on the History of Scotland (1773) and Considerations on the Present State of the Peerage of Scotland (1774). Alexander Carlyle, in his autobiography, described Lord Elibank as one of the most learned and ingenious noblemen of his time, and as having a mind that embraced the greatest variety of topics and produced the most original remarks.

Details of his connection with James Boswell:

Boswell was with him on 26/11-62 at Lord Eglinton's, describing him as a man of great genius, great knowledge, and much whim. Boswell had a conversation with Lord Elibank in the company of Lord Eglinton, James Macdonald and Thomas Sheridan, mentioned in LJ 291162.

Boswell and Johnson also visited the Lord during their 1773 tour of the Hebrides.

Sir Patrick was a wit, raconteur and friend of Dr. Johnson. He succeeded to the title as 5th Lord, and was also Lieutenant-Colonel in Wynyards Marines. He was a sometime member of the Cocoa Tree Club and The Poker Club. Besides this, he was a Jacobite who had an involvement with the Elibank plot. "There was to be one more serious conspiracy against King George and his government, the Elibank Plot, which was penetrated and exploded in 1753 by the government led by Henry Pelham, heir to Walpole. The debacle cost the life of the last Jacobite martyr, Dr. Archie Cameron, younger brother to Lochiel, but really by 1753 Prince Charles, despite an expedient conversion to Anglicanism, was not politically viable". A brilliant man of great knowledge, Sir Patrick wrote "Essays on Paper Money, Banking, etc. "(1755) "Thoughts on Money, Circulation, and Paper Currency" (1758), "Inquiry into the Origin and Consequence of the Public Debts "(1758/9), "Queries Relating to the Proposed Plan for Altering Entails in Scotland"(1765), "Letter to Lord Hailes on his Remarks on the History of Scotland" (1773) and "Considerations on the Present State of the Peerage of Scotland "(1774). Alexander Carlyle, in his autobiography, described Lord Elibank as one of the most learned and ingenious noblemen of his time, and as having a mind that embraced the greatest variety of topics and produced the most original remarks. He was a good friend of most notable men of letters of the time, including Boswell. In 1773 Boswell and Samuel Johnson visited Sir Patrick during a tour of the Hebrides. Lord Eglinton described him as a man of great genius, great knowledge and much whim.

Boswell was with him on 26/11-62 at Lord Eglinton's, describing him as a man of great genius, great knowledge, and much whim. Boswell had a conversation with Lord Elibank in the company of Lord Eglinton, James Macdonald and Thomas Sheridan, mentioned in LJ 291162.

Boswell and Johnson also visited the Lord during their 1773 tour of the Hebrides.

 

From the letters of Horace Walpole:

"Lord Cromartie was receiver of the rents of the King's second son in
Scotland, which, it was understood, he should not account for; and by
that means had six-hundred a-year from the Government: Lord Elibank, a very prating, impertinent Jacobite, was bound for him in nine thousand pounds, for which the Duke is determined to sue him".

 

MURRAY, PATRICK, fifth lord Elibank, a nobleman distinguished by erudition and literary taste, was the eldest son of Alexander, the preceding lord, by Elizabeth, daughter of George Stirling, surgeon in Edinburgh. He was born in February, 1703. For reasons with which we are unacquainted, he studied for the Scottish bar, at which he entered in 1723, but in the same year adopted the military profession, and soon rose to a considerable rank in the army. He was, in 1740, a lieutenant-colonel under lord Cathcart, in the expedition to Carthagena, of which he wrote an account, that remains in manuscript in the library of the Board of Trade. He had now succeeded to the family title, and was distinguished for his wit and general ability. His miscellaneous reading was extensive and we have the authority of Dr Johnson, that it was improved by his own observations of the world. He lived for many years at a curious old house, belonging to the family of North, at Catage in Cambridgeshire; and it has been recently ascertained that he kept up a correspondence with the exiled house of Stuart. In the latter part of his life, he appears to have chiefly resided in Edinburgh, mingling with the distinguished literati of the city, who were his contemporaries, and fully qualified by his talents and knowledge, to adorn even that society.

In 1758, he published at Edinburgh, "Thoughts on Money, Circulation, and Paper Currency;" and an "Inquiry into the Origin and Consequence of the Public Debts" appeared afterwards. In 1765, he issued "Queries relating to the proposed Plan for altering Entails in Scotland," and, in 1773, a "Letter to lord Hailes on his Remarks on the History of Scotland." His lordship’s political life was entirely that of an opposition lord, and, among other subjects which attracted his indignant attention, was the servile condition of his native peerage. In the year 1774, he published a work under the title of "Considerations on the Present State of the Peerage of Scotland," which attracted a considerable degree of attention. "Never," says he "was there so humbling a degradation as what the Scots peers of the first rank and pretensions suffer, by the present mode of their admittance to the house of lords. For the truth of this, one needs but to appeal to their own feelings, or to the common estimation of mankind. A Scots peer of the first rank is considered as an instrument singled out, and posted in the house of lords by the appointment of the minister at the time, for the end of supporting his measures, whatever they are or may be; and who, in case of failure, must expect to be turned out at the expiration of his term of seven years. He is supposed to be composed of such pliant materials, that in the event of a change of administration, the next minister makes no doubt of finding him equally obsequious, and ready to renounce his former connexions." When Dr Johnson visited Scotland in 1773, lord Elibank addressed to him a courteous letter, which is to be found in Boswell’s Tour to the Hebrides, where are also the records of various conversations in which both men flourished. The English philosopher declared that he never met his lordship, without going away a " wiser man." Lord Elibank in early life married the dowager lady North and Grey, who was by birth a Dutch-woman, and of illustrious extraction. He died, without issue, August 3, 1778, in the seventy-sixth year of his age.

 

Dr. Johnson quote: "Johnson characterized three orders of persons, in General Oglethorpe, Lord Elibank, and Burnet, Bishop of Salisbury. Oglethorpe never completed what he had to say; Elibank had nothing conclusive in his talk ; and Burnet took no pains to be right.".

 

Margaretta Maria DE JONGE and Patrick MURRAY had the following children:

 

Maria Margaret MURRAY (1765?-1855). Maria was born in 1765 (calculated). She died on 15 January 1855 in Florence.

 

3. Mary MORTLOCK has few details recorded about her. She and Patrick MURRAY had the following children:

 

1

Ann MURRAY ( -1843)

Third Generation

4. Alexander MURRAY 4th Lord Elibank, son of Sir Patrick 3rd MURRAY 3rd Lord Elibank and Anna BURNET, was born on 9 March 1677. He was a 4th Lord Elibank. He had the title '4th Lord Elibank'. He married Elizabeth STIRLING in February 1698. He died on 6 February 1735.

 

Sir Alexander became 4th Lord Elibank on his father's death in 1686, when he was nine years old. He had 15 children of whom 5 sons and 5 daughters survived him.

As a matter of interest, the Lord of Elibank voted for the Union of the Scottish and English Parliaments in Edinburgh in 1706-1707. He also recieved ?0 for doing so. This information was stated by The Earl of Glasgow, on oath, and by David Nairne, Secretary Deputy of Scotland. What a price for Scotland's freedom!

Alexander and his family had many financial problems, and the depletion of the family fortunes to the Stuart coffers was further exacerbated by the Fourth Earl losing heavily in the South Sea Bubble. He wrote to his wife about this - "I am infinitely vexed that you should torment yourself so much, which I assure you is more galling to me than any misfortune that has yet befallen me. As I shall answer God I have never bought a farthing's worth of stock but that third subscription, nor you may depend upon it will I venture a groat more that way, for now the South Sea has fallen to its primitive 110 this day (it stood at 1,000 a few days previously) so that it seems now past all recovery; what parliament will be able to do with it I cannot tell".

At the time, the Scottish Nobility was also in a generally impoverished state, and so Elibank's situation was not by any means unique.

Alexander devoted much of his life to the (succesful) reform of agriculture in Scotland, and was a founder of the "Society of Improvers in the knowledge fo Agriculture in Scotland".

Alexander was clearly loved and respected by both friends and family, and his son Patrick wrote of him: "My father, Alexander, Lord Elibank, died of what the Phisicians called the gout in his stomach on the 6th of February, 1736, The following character was given him in the common newspapers - "He lived esteemed and beloved by men of all ranks and parties and his death is universally lamented. No man ever surpassed himin the practice of every social virtue, he was a fond Husband, and indulgent Parent, and an unalterable friend, and as he never had an enemy he never was accused or suspected of anyone. Never was there a juster character"".

 

5. Elizabeth STIRLING, daughter of George STIRLING, was born before 1683. She appeared in the census. She celebrated her Bar Mitzvah. She died on 11 November 1756.

 

Book: "The five sons of Bare Betty" by A.C, Murray:

Elizabeth, who married at 16, displayed form her early teens an independence of character which not infrequently led her into eccentricities, and hse handed on to her sons the traits she herslef possessed of vivacity and original wit in thoought, speech and action. In his "Scotland and Scotsmen" Ramsey tells us an intertesing and amusing anecdote. A somewhat rash Edinburgh minister when conducting "public examinations" referred to Miss Elizabeth as "Betty Stirling". This caused deep offence to the dignity of the young lady: "Mistress Betty" or "Miss Betty", she said in tones of scathing rebuke, was the style of address to which she was accustomed, but certainly not "bare Betty". Needless to say, after this incident, she was always known in Edinburgh and district as "bare Betty".

When a man, who was deeply in love with her, told her that he was ready to lay down his life for her sake, "Oh," she said, "I do not believe you would part with a little joint of your little finger for my whole body." Next day the gentleman returned, and presented her triumphantly with the joint of one of his little fingers. But he was dumbfounded when she gave him a peremptory refusal, "for," said she, "the man who has no mercy on his own flesh will certainly not spare mine."

But despite this mercurial turn "bare Betty had a tender side to her character, and was much beloved by all her family.

 

Alexander MURRAY and Elizabeth STIRLING had the following children:

 

2

Patrick MURRAY (1703-1778)

Alexander MURRAY (1704-1705). Alexander was born on 23 July 1704. He died in 1705.

George MURRAY (1706-1785). George was born on 14 May 1706 in Aberlady. He was an Admiral in the Navy. He had the title 'Admiral, 6th Lord Elibank'. He married Isabella MCKENZIE on 8 January 1760. He died on [Julian] 12 November 1785 in Ballencrieff.

Gideon MURRAY (1710-1776). Gideon was born on 5 February 1710 in Ballencrieff. He was a Priest. He married Elizabeth MONTOLIEU DE ST. HYPPOLITE on [Julian] 30 June 1746 in London. He died on [Julian] 21 June 1776 in Wandsworth.

John MURRAY (1711-1711). John was born on 14 September 1711. He died on 31 December 1711.

Alexander MURRAY (1712-1778). Alexander was born on 9 December 1712 in Ballencrieff. He was christened on 9 December 1712 in Aberlady. He was a Politician. He had the title 'Jacobite Earl of Westminster'. He died on 27 February 1778 in Taplow, Bucks.

James Patrick 1 MURRAY (1721-1794). James was born on [Julian] 21 January 1721 in Ballencrieff. He was a Governor General of Canada, General in the Army, Governor of Minorca, Governor of Hull, Warden of the Cinque Ports. He married Cordelia COLLIER in 1748 in London. He married Ann WHITHAM on 14 March 1780 in Minorca. He died on 18 June 1794 in Beauport, Hastings, Sussex.

Barbara MURRAY ( -1773). Barbara married James JOHNSTONE on 1 September 1719. She died on 15 March 1773.

Elizabeth MURRAY (1701-1748). Elizabeth was born on 26 August 1701. She was baptised on 27 August 1701. She died on 19 March 1748 in Edinburgh.

Anne MURRAY (1708-1793). Anne was born on 20 September 1708. She married James FERGUSON on 3 February 1733 in Aberlady. She died on 2 January 1793.

Mary MURRAY (1714-1772). Mary was born on 4 September 1714. She was baptised on 5 September 1714. She died on 18 June 1772.

Helen MURRAY (1716-1809). Helen was born on 19 January 1716. She was baptised on 24 January 1716. She married John (James) STEWART on 12 September 1761 in Edinburgh. She died on 28 December 1809 in Ormistoun.

Janet MURRAY (1723- ). Janet was born on 13 July 1723. She was baptised on 19 July 1723. She married Robert MURRAY on 22 June 1750.