See also

Matilda BOULOGNE ( -1151)

1. Matilda de BOULOGNE, son of Eustace III EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE ( -c. 1125) and Mary of Scotland ( - ), died in 1151. He married Stephen de Blois, Count of Mortain KING OF ENGLAND.

Second Generation

2. Eustace III EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE, son of Eustace II, Gernobadatus EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE and Ida von Niederlothringen (of Moselle & Lorraine), died circa 1125. He married Mary of Scotland.

 

Eustace III, was a count of Boulogne, successor to his father Count Eustace II of Boulogne. His mother was Ida of Lorraine.

Eustace appeared at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 as an ally of William the Conqueror, and is listed as a possible killer of Harold II; he is also believed to have given William his own horse after the duke's was killed under him by Gyrth, brother of Harold.

He succeeded to Count of Boulogne in 1087.

He went on the First Crusade in 1096 with his brothers Godfrey of Bouillon (duke of Lower Lotharingia) and Baldwin of Boulogne. He soon returned to Europe to administer his domains. He married Mary of Scotland, daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland, and Saint Margaret of Scotland. Eustace and Mary had one daughter, Matilda of Boulogne.

When his youngest brother king Baldwin I of Jerusalem died in 1118, the elderly Eustace was offered the throne. Eustace was at first uninterested, but was convinced to accept it; he travelled all the way to Apulia before learning that a distant relative, Baldwin of Bourcq, had been crowned in the meantime. Eustace returned to Boulogne and died about 1125.

On his death the county of Boulogne was inherited by his daughter, Matilda, and her husband Stephen de Blois, count of Mortain, afterwards king of England, and at the death of Matilda in 1151 it was inherited by their son, Eustace IV of Boulogne, later their second son William and ultimately by their daughter Marie of Boulogne, since both sons died without children.

 

3. Mary of Scotland was the daughter of Malcolm III KING OF SCOTLAND and Saint Margaret "the Exile". She and Eustace III EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE had the following children:

 

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Matilda de BOULOGNE ( -1151)

Third Generation

4. Eustace II, Gernobadatus EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE, son of Eustache I de Boulogne and Mathilde (Maud MAHAUT) VON LOWEN, was born circa 1030 in Boulogne. He died in 1087. He married Ida von Niederlothringen (of Moselle & Lorraine) in December 1093. He married Godgifu. He married unk.

 

Eustace II, (b.1015-1020 d. 1070) was count of Boulogne from 1049-1093, fought on the Norman side at the Battle of Hastings, and afterwards received a large honour in England.

He was the son of Eustace I. His first wife was Goda, daughter of the English king Æthelred the Unready, and sister of Edward the Confessor. Goda died in 1055, before the Norman Conquest of her homeland, in which her husband participated. From his second marriage with Ida of Lorraine (daughter of Godfrey III, Duke of Lower Lorraine), Eustace had three sons, Eustace III, the next count of Boulogne, and Godfrey of Bouillon and Baldwin, both later monarchs of Jerusalem.

In 1048 Eustace joined his father-in-law's rebellion against the Emperor Henry III. The next year Eustace was excommunicated by Pope Leo IX for marrying within the prohibited degree of kinship. It's likely the pope's action was at the behest of Henry III. The rebellion failed, and in 1049 Eustance and Godfrey submitted to Henry III.

Eustace paid a visit to England in 1051, and was honourably received at the Confessor's court. Edward and Eustace were former brothers-in-law and remained allied politically. On the other hand the dominant figure in England, Earl Godwin, had recently married his son Tostig to the daughter of Eustace's rival the count of Flanders. Furthermore Godwin's son Sweyn had been feuding with Eustace's stepson Ralph the Timid.

A brawl in which Eustace and his servants became involved with the citizens of Dover led to a serious quarrel between the king and Godwin. The latter, to whose jurisdiction the men of Dover were subject, refused to punish them. His lack of respect to those in authority was made the excuse for outlawing himself and his family. They left England, but returned the next year (1052) with a large army, aided by the Flemish.

In 1052 William of Talou rebelled against his nephew William of Normandy. Eustace may well have been involved in this rebellion, although there is no specific evidence, for after William of Talou's surrender he fled to the Boulonnais court.

The following years saw still further advances by Eustace's rivals and enemies. Count Baldwin of Flanders consolidated his hold over territories he had annexed to the east. In 1060 he became regent of France during the minority of his nephew Philip I of France. In contrast Eustace's stepson Walter of Mantes failed in his attempt to claim the County of Maine. He was captured by the Normans and died soon afterwards in mysterious circumstances.

These events evidently caused a shift in Eustace political allegiances, for he then became an important participant in the Norman conquest of England in 1066. He fought at Hastings, although sources vary regarding the details of his conduct during the battle. Eustace received large land grants afterwards, which suggests he contributed in other ways as well, perhaps by providing ships.

In the following year, probably because he was dissatisfied with his share of the spoil, he assisted the Kentishmen in an attempt to seize Dover Castle. The conspiracy failed, and Eustace was sentenced to forfeit his English fiefs.

Subsequently he was reconciled to the Conqueror, who restored a portion of the confiscated lands.

Eustace died in 1093, and was succeeded by his son, Eustace III.

It has been suggested that Eustace was the patron of the Bayeux Tapestry.

 

unk and Eustace II, Gernobadatus EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE had the following children:

 

Geoffrey (Godefroy) Lord of Carshalton (Alton) ( - )

Ida de Boulogne ( - )

 

5. Ida von Niederlothringen (of Moselle & Lorraine) (also known as St. Ida of LORRAINE), daughter of Godfrey III, Duke of Lower Lorraine and Doda, was born in 1040 in Bass, Lorraine. She died on 13 August 1113. She and Eustace II, Gernobadatus EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE had the following children:

 

Galfrid (Godfrey) (IV) de Boulogne King of Jerusalem (c. 1062-1100). Galfrid was born circa 1062. He died on 18 July 1100 in Jerusalem.

Baudouin I de Bouillon KING OF JERUSALEM (c. 1060-1118). Baudouin was born circa 1060. He died on 2 April 1118 in Palestine.

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Eustace III EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE ( -c. 1125)

 

6. Malcolm III KING OF SCOTLAND, son of Duncan I KING OF SCOTLAND and Sybilla of Northumbria, was born circa 1031. He died on [Julian] 13 November 1093. He married Saint Margaret "the Exile".

 

Malcolm III 'Caennmor', King of Scotland was the son of Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Scotland and Sybilla of Northumbria. He was born circa 1031.1 He married, firstly, Ingibiorg 'Earl's Mother' Finnsdottir, daughter of Finn Arnasson, Jarl of Halland and Bergljot, between 1059 and 1066. He married, secondly, Saint Margaret 'the Exile', daughter of Edward 'Atheling' and Agatha, in 1069 at Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. He died on 13 November 1093 at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England, killed by Arkil Morel in an ambush. He was buried at El Escorial Palace, Madrid, Spain. He was buried at Tynemouth, Tyne and Wear, England. He was buried at Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife.
He gained the title of Prince Malcolm of Cumbria in 1034. He gained the title of King Malcolm of Strathclyde in 1034. He succeeded to the title of King Malcolm III of Scotland on 17 March 1058.1 He was crowned King of Scotland on 25 April 1058 at Scone Abbey, Scone, Perthshire, Scotland.
He succeeded Macbeth, but was exiled to England during the reign of Macbeth. With English military help he defeated (1054 - Battle of Dunsinane) and killed (1057) Macbeth, and became King of Scotland after the death of Macbeth's stepson and successor Lulach. Five times he unsuccessfully invaded northern England, and was killed on the fifth attempt. He was effectively ruler of Strathclyde and Lothian from 1054.

 

7. Saint Margaret "the Exile", daughter of Edward KING OF ENGLAND (UNCROWNED) and Agatha of Brunswick, was born in 1045 in Hungary. She died on [Julian] 16 November 1093 in Edinburgh Castle.

 

Saint Margaret 'the Exile' was the daughter of Edward 'Atheling' and Agatha. She was born in 1045 at Hungary. She married Malcolm III 'Caennmor', King of Scotland, son of Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Scotland and Sybilla of Northumbria, in 1069 at Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. She died on 16 November 1093 at Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland. She was buried at Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife. She was buried at Jesuit College, Douai, France.


She was the granddaughter of Edmund Ironsides and 7th in descent from Alfred the Great
In 1250 she was canonised as Saint Margaret.

Born about 1045, Princess Margaret was a daughter of Edward "Outremere", or "the Exile", and Agatha, kinswoman of Gisela, the wife of St. Stephen of Hungary . She was the granddaughter of Edmund Ironside.



The chief authority for Margaret's life is the contemporary biography printed in Roman " Acta SS .", II, June, 320. Its authorship has been ascribed to Turgot, the Saint's confessor, a monk of Durham and later Archbishop of St. Andrews, as well as to Theodoric, a somewhat obscure monk

The Norman conquest forced the Anglo Margaret and her family to flee to Scotland in 1070 where shortly thereafter she married the King, Malcom II (Canmore). As Queen and co-Regent, Margaret bore eight children (two daughters and six sons). She was known to have been a particularly involved and good mother - a departure from the contemporary practice of leaving the rearing of children to servants and tutors. Margaret's daughter Matilda married Henry I of England , making her an ancestress of the present British royal house.



Queen Margaret was renown for her moderating and good influence on her husband and for her devout piety and religious observance. As Queen, Margaret used her influence to bring Scotland into the more modern practices, disciplines of European Christianity and is celebrated as a clerical reformer. Though strong-willed, Margaret used reason and encouragement to influence change, not her authority as co-Regent and Queen. Under Queen Margaret's leadership the Rite of the Celebration of the Mass was brought under standardized norms, the vernacular of the Mass was changed from the many dialects of Gaelic spoken throughout Scotland to the unifying Latin, the Scots began to receive Communion regularly, and the observance of Lent was improved.



Although her influence in causing the clergy to adopt Latin to celebrate the Mass was intended as a tool by which all Scots could worship in unity, along with the other Christians of Western Europe, Queen Margaret's introduction of Anglo-Norman manners and values into Celtic Scotland laid the cultural groundwork for the future induction of her land and people into a greater England and Britain. While many hagiographers view Queen Margaret's goals as not simply uniting the Scots, but Scotland and England together as a way of ending bloody warfare amongst the clannish highlanders, Scotland returned to a period of isolation immediately following her death.



In 1093, King Malcom was murdered through treachery near Alnwick and was buried at Dunfermline Abbey, which had been founded by in 1072 Margaret. She foretold the day of her death, joining her husband's eternal rest on 16 November 1093, her body being buried before the high altar at Dunfermline.



In 1250, Queen Margaret was canonized by Innocent IV, and her relics were translated on 19 June, 1259, to a new shrine, the base of which is still visible beyond the modern east wall of her restored chapel. At the Reformation her head passed into the possession of Mary Queen of Scots, and later was secured by the Jesuits at Douai , where it is believed to have perished during the French Revolution. According to George Conn, " De duplici statu religionis apud Scots " (Rome, 1628), the rest of the relics, together with those of Malcolm, were acquired by Philip II of Spain, and placed in two urns in the Escorial. When, however, Bishop Gillies of Edinburgh applied through Pius IX for their restoration to Scotland , they could not be found.



St. Margaret is remembered for her fervent faith, practiced piety and religious observance and continues to be celebrated as Scotland's most beloved saint. St. Margaret was loved by the poor, especially orphans to whom she was particularly attached in personal care and through the unceasing distribution of alms. She was the foundress of many churches, convents and monasteries, including the Abbey of Dunfermline, built to enshrine her greatest treasure, a relic of the true Cross. Her book of the Gospels, richly adorned with jewels, which one day dropped into a river and was according to legend miraculously recovered, is now in the Bodleian library at Oxford . St. Margaret's son King David of Scotland is also celebrated by the people of Scotland as a Saint.
Feast of St. Margaret of Scotland

The feast of St. Margaret is observed by the whole Roman Catholic Church on 10 June. The Episcopal Church Commemorates St. Margaret each year on the Sunday closest to the anniversary of her death November, 16 th .

This is the fast that I choose, says the Lord: to share your bread with the hungry, and bring the homeless poor into your house; when you see the naked, to cover them, and not to hid yourself from your own kin. Isaiah 58:6-7.

 

Malcolm III KING OF SCOTLAND and Saint Margaret "the Exile" had the following children:

 

Editha of Scotland (c. 1079-1118) (known as 'Matilda'). Matilda was born circa 1079 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. She had the title 'Queen Consort Matilda'. She married Henry I KING OF ENGLAND on [Julian] 11 November 1100. She died on [Julian] 1 May 1118 in Westminster Palace.

3

Mary of Scotland ( - )