See also

Pharamus (c. 1105- )

1. Pharamus de Boulogne de Tingry, son of William de Boulogne (c. 1080-bef1130), was born circa 1105 in England. He married Matilda.

 

‘But the greatest of the barons of the Boulonnais in the twelfth century in England was Feramus or Pharamus seigneur of Tingry whom I have made the subject of a monograph. Known in England as Faramus of Boulogne he was the son of a William of Boulogne who held land in Surrey and Northamptonshire under Henry I, and a grandson of Geoffrey son-presumably natural son-of Count Eustace II. Maternally Faramus was a grandson of a Domesday tenant in chief Geoffrey de Mandeville ancestor of the earls of Essex.”.

 

Matilda and Pharamus de Boulogne de Tingry had the following children:

 

Sibille de Bolougne TINGRY (c. 1132- ). Sibille was born circa 1132.

Second Generation

2. William de Boulogne, son of Geoffrey (Godefroy) Lord of Carshalton (Alton) and Beatrice de Mandeville, was born circa 1080. He died before 1130.

 

William de Boulogne had the following children:

 

1

Pharamus de Boulogne de Tingry (c. 1105- )

Third Generation

3. Geoffrey (Godefroy) Lord of Carshalton (Alton), son of Eustace II, Gernobadatus EARL (COUNT) OF BOLOINE and unk, married Beatrice de Mandeville.

 

This son Geoffrey, whom Davis, in editing Regestra Regum Anglo-Normannorum (I, 54, note to document No. 202), has oddly enough confused with the other son of Eustace, Godfrey of Bouillon, became an important landholder in England. He married the daughter of Geoffrey of Mandeville, one of the most important barons of England, and received large grants from his father-in-law. The daughter's name was Beatrice, as is apparent from a charter of William I, in which he "confirms a grant to St. Peter. which Geoffrey, a son of Count Eustace, gave on behalf of his wife Beatrice with the consent of Geoffrey of Mandeville." His father-in-law served as a witness (see above document in Davis). Domesday states that in Surrey a certan Wesman held six hides of Geoffrey, son of Count Eustace, whch had been given him by Geoffrey of Mandeville with the latter's daughter (Domesday, I, 36). Descendants of Geoffrey were still living at the end fo the twelfth century. Cf. Round, "Faramus of Boulogne" in Genealogist, N.S> XII (1896), 145-151


In Wallington Hundred

Geoffrey himself holds Carshalton. 5 free men [held it] of King Edward, and they could go where they would. Of these, 1 held 2 hides, and 4 [held] 6 hides apiece. There were 5 manors. Now it is in 1 manor. It was then assessed at 27 hides; now at 3 hides. There is land for 10 ploughs. In demesne is 1 [plough]; and 9 villans and 9 cottars with 5 ploughs. There is a church, and 7 slaves, and 12 acres of meadow. The men of the shire or of the hundred say that they have never seen the writ or the livery officer who on the king's behalf had given Geoffrey seisin of this manor. TRE it was worth £20; when he was seised of it, 100s; now £10. Of these hides, Wesman holds 6 hides of Geoffrey son of Count Eustace. Geoffrey de Mandeville gave him [i.e. Geoffrey] this land with his daughter. In demesne is 1 plough; and 3 villans and 1 cottar with 3 ploughs, and a mill rendering 35s, and 3 slaves, and 10 acres of meadow. {There is] woodland for 2 pigs. There is land for 2 ploughs. TRE it was worth £4; and afterwards 40s; now 100s. Of the same hides, a certain smith of the king's has half a hide, with TRE he received with his wife, but he has never done service for it.”.

 

4. Beatrice de Mandeville was the daughter of Geoffrey de Mandeville. She and Geoffrey (Godefroy) Lord of Carshalton (Alton) had the following children:

 

2

William de Boulogne (c. 1080-bef1130)