See also

Marion MCLEOD (1882-1927)

1. Marion MCLEOD, daughter of Robert A MCLEOD (c. 1853-1933) and Elizabeth Rushworth MURRAY (1859-1949), was born on 8 July 1882. She died in 1927. She married James E WINCHELL.

 

James E WINCHELL and Marion MCLEOD had the following children:

 

Robert E WINCHELL (1918- ). Robert was born in 1918.

Second Generation

2. Robert A MCLEOD was born circa 1853. He died in 1933. He married Elizabeth Rushworth MURRAY.

 

Robert A. Mcleod, may have served in Custer's Army but we know nothing concrete except that he who was born in Scotland and we believe immigrated to the US through Canada. On his death certificate his father is listed as John Mcleod, born Scotland. (Kim E Winchell). McLeod was "of Cleveland Ohio".

 

3. Elizabeth Rushworth MURRAY, daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Douglas Alexander MURRAY and Mary Ann BELTZHOOVER, was born in 1859. She died in 1949.

 

Elizabeth and Robert lived in Cleveland, Ohio and upon his passing, Elizabeth lived with her daughter, Katherine Elizabeth Neuman, until her passing in 1949. Elizabeth was "of Carlisle, PA".

 

Robert A MCLEOD and Elizabeth Rushworth MURRAY had the following children:

 

1

Marion MCLEOD (1882-1927)

Catherine Morrison MCLEOD (1883-1983). Catherine was born on 6 December 1883 in Cleveland, Ohio. She died in November 1983.

Third Generation

4. Lieutenant Colonel Douglas Alexander MURRAY, son of Major General James Patrick 2 MURRAY and Elizabeth RUSHWORTH, was born on 2 January 1824 in Killinure House, Westmeath, Ireland. He married Mary Anne MURPHY on 10 November 1848 in St. Louis, Missouri. He married Mary Ann BELTZHOOVER on 8 November 1855 in (First Evangelical Lutheran Church) Carlyle, Pennsylvania. He died on 19 July 1866 in Washington DC. He was buried in Carlyle, Pennsylvania.

 



From Heitman's "Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army" (1886), page 738:
Born in England, appointed an officer from the Army. Served as a private, corporal, and sergeant in Company F, 1st US Artillery from November 23, 1850 to March 23, 1855. Served as a private in Company F, 1st US Artillery and in General Service from October 7, 1856 to October 10, 1861. Appointed Lieutenant Colonel, 3rd Ohio Cavalry on October 10, 1861. resigned this position on June 7, 1863. In the meantime had been appointed a 2nd Lieutenant in the 4th US Cavalry in the regular army on July 17, 1862, but never served with the regiment. He resigned this commission on June 18, 1863.



1850:
Born Wickham, England. Age 27, blue eyes, brown hair, ruddy complexion, 5'9" tall. Occupation: clerk. Enlisted in New Orleans, Louisiana by Lieutenant David on November 23, 1850 into Company F, 1st U S Artillery. Discharged at Fort McIntosh, Texas at the expiration of his term of service as a sergeant on November 23, 1855.
1856:
Born Farsham (or Farnham) in Wickham, England. Age 33, grey eyes, brown hair, fair complexion, 5'8" tall. Occupation: soldier. Enlisted in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by Lieutenant Bootes on October 7, 1856 into Company F, 1st US Artillery. Discharged on August 7, 1861 upon his re-enlistment, no location or rank listed.
1861:
Born Wickham, England. Age 36, grey eyes, brown hair, ruddy complexion, 5'9" tall. Enlisted at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania by Captain Jonas P. Holliday of the 2nd US Cavalry on August 7, 1861 into service at the "Cavalry Depot." Discharged on october 11, 1861 by Special Order 267, Adjutant General's Office, dated October 3, 1861, at carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania as a sergeant.

 

].

 



Douglas joined the U.S. Army and commanded the 3rd Ohio Cavalry.He fought in several battles of the Civil War and was severely wounded, losing his left arm. He received the rank of Lieutenant Colonel on October 10, 1861. He resigned June 7th, 1863, but it is not known whether this was on account of his injuries.

 

Freemason

Just previous to the battle of Shiloh, the 3rd. Ohio cavalry, commanded at the time by Lt. Col. Murray, took possession of Lawrenceburgh, Tennessee. The people of the place were understood to be all Secessionists, and the Lt. Col. Ordered his men to search all the houses, arrest all the men, and take possession of all guns and other arms…being careful to protect the women and children from all harm and insult. While this was going on, Col. Murray rode down the street, and while in front of the Masonic Hall, noticed that some of his men had been in the Lodge-room and taken possession of some articles belonging to the Lodge. Immediately ordered them to return every article to its place, and then placed a guard at the door to protect the hall from future violation.

During the Battle of Shiloh, the Third Ohio Cavalry captured a Confederate Surgeon. The Surgeon asked Lieutenant Colonel Murray if he was not the officer who had saved the Masonic Lodge at Lawrenceburgh, TN from being ransacked and was informed that he was. The doctor then told Lieutenant Colonel Murray that it was that fact alone that had saved him from being ambushed. A Confederate Mason who had witnessed his generous act at Lawrenceburgh had recognized him and ordered his men to lower their guns and let him pass.

 

Battle of the Right Wing - Murray making a "handsome dash"


Rosecrans' Campaign with the Fourteenth Army Corps, Or, the Army of the ...
By William Denison Bickham

BATTLE OF THE RIGHT WING...
The Third Ohio, Lieutenant Colonel D. H. Murray, when the Right broke, also made a handsome dash, and drove the enemy from McCook's ammunition train. Subsequently they charged, saved the train of the Center, drove off the rebels, recaptured a hospital, and captured many prisoners under Colonel Eennett's eye. Two companies of this regiment were rallied by Colonel Eennett, who carried them into action, driving the enemy from the pike, recapturing a gun by a dashing charge, saving a train, and rescuing many of our men. Lieutenant Murray distiaguished himself in this affair. Colonel Kennett himself had a hand to hand encounter with a rebel horseman. The result was doubtful. The rebel had leveled his carbine, the Colonel had his pistol leveled, and both were about to fire, when Farrish, an orderly of Kennett, threw his revolving ,rifie into the scale. The rebel delivered his arms and himself. In the charge of the Third Ohio, Farrish killed two rebels, and Jaggers, another orderly, rode down two gray-jackets, and released two of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry who had surrendered. Colonel Zahn, of the Third Ohio Cavalry, commanding brigade, had been fighting incessantly from the beginning of the disaster up to this period. He was compelled to retire before the rebel infantry, but a charge of rebel cavalry was handsomely repulsed by the First Ohio Cavalry, Colonel Minor Millikin, and the Third Ohio Cavalry. Major A. B. Moore, of the former regiment, fell mortally wounded in this charge. The enemy charged Zahn twice in succession, and were again and again repelled, Zahn now went to the rescue of McCook's ammunition train, which was again in jeopardy. The enemy appeared in heavy force. After a gallant stand by the First, Third, and Fourth Ohio Cavalry, Zahn was compelled to retire, the dashing Colonel Millikin and his Adjutant, Lieutenant Condit, being fatally hurt. Millikin had been surrounded, but by his courage and his prowess with his saber, he cut his way through, and was escaping, when a rebel sharpshooter brought him down. There was no more gallant rider in that field. His sorrowing soldiers bore him to the rear, where he soon breathed his last, lamented by hosts of friends.

 



D. A. MURRAY,
Lieutenant-Colonel Third Ohio Cavalry, Commanding.

P. S.--Since writing the above Private Steckel has recognized Lewis Turner, another of the prisoners, also John Peters, as being two that were of the party. Private William Smith, Company C, recognizes one of the prisoners, Fletcher, as being one that fired upon him a few days since; Private Smith is now lying in hospital from wounds received, he states, by his hands.
Respectfully, yours,
D. A. MURRAY,
Lieutenant-Colonel Third Ohio Cavalry, Commanding.

(Col. J. B. FRY, Chief of Staff, Army of the Ohio.)


HEADQUARTERS THIRD OHIO CAVALRY, In Camp, Woodville, Ala., August 7, 1862.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report for your information that the squadron of the Third Ohio Cavalry that left these headquarters on the morning of the 5th instant on a reconnaissance to the river opposite to Guntersville returned this day at noon.

The officer in command of the squadron reports that the encampment of the enemy has been moved back from the river about 2 miles, and there appears to be a larger force there now than when our troops, accompanied by artillery and infantry, were there. The enemy have dug rifle pits, and have also mounted two pieces of artillery to command the old ferries at that point. The ferry-boats destroyed by our troops are being repaired, and I have heard from good authority will be ready for use this day or to-morrow. It is rumored that they, the enemy, will cross with the intention of destroying the bridges on the railroad as soon as they possibly can. If not too great a liberty, might I suggest that two pieces of artillery may be sent to this point or the bridge near by. I have no doubt if artillery were here and could be spared they would render good service. The country being so miserably adapted for cavalry being as effectual as they otherwise would be on more suitable ground might be obviated by having the assistance of artillery. If artillery cannot be spared, two companies of infantry would, I have no doubt, prevent any damage being done to railroad in our vicinity.
The squadron arrested Mr. Hornbuckle, a noted bushwhacker, who attempted after his arrest to escape, and did succeed in getting off some distance; would have made good his escape but for the steps taken to prevent it.

Very respectfully, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,
D. A. MURRAY,
Lieutenant-Colonel Third Ohio Cavalry, Commanding.


(Col. J. B. FRY, Chief of Staff.)

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XX/1 [S# 29]
DECEMBER 26, 1862-JANUARY 5, 1863.--The Stone's River or Murfreesborough, Tenn., Campaign.
No. 178.--Report of Lieut. Col. Douglas A. Murray, Third Ohio Cavalry, including skirmishes at Franklin, December 26-27, and Overall's Creek, December 31.
HEADQUARTERS THIRD OHIO CAVALRY,
In Camp near Murfreesborough, Tenn., January 6, 1863.

COLONEL: In compliance with instructions received from your head quarters, I have the honor to report, for your information, the part taken by the Third Ohio Cavalry in the several engagements in which the regiment was engaged since leaving Nashville, Tenn., on December 26 last, on which day we proceeded to Franklin, driving the enemy therefrom and taking possession of the town; took some 10 prisoners. Remaining in town some time, we recrossed the river, and marched across the country to Wilson Creek pike, about 14 miles from Nashville, and encamped, arriving in camp at about 10 p.m.
On the 27th, the Third Battalion of the regiment moved toward Franklin, and found that the enemy had in strong force again taken possession of the town; the battalion drove in their pickets under a heavy fire, killing 3 of them. Seeing that the enemy were in such force, the commander deemed it prudent to retire, and rejoined the regiment, which picketed the roads, &c., in the vicinity of its camp.
On the 28th ultimo, proceeded to Triune and encamped, leaving early next morning across the country toward Murfreesborough, proceeding about 5 miles in that direction, when attacked by the enemy's pickets in force, which we drove, skirmishing, they frequently making a stand, which we each time broke, and still drove them about 5 miles.
The 30th ultimo, ordered to proceed to Stone's River; proceeded but a short distance when attacked by the enemy's pickets; the enemy were in force in our front with artillery. We therefore retired, forming on the high ground in our rear to receive them, their pickets, or patrol, advancing, which we repulsed. In the evening our brigade was re-enforced by one battery of artillery and three regiments of infantry, and proceeded in reconnaissance to the left of the enemy's lines, where we found General Hardee's corps d'armée ready, in line of battle, to receive us. We retired, and encamped in the woods, about 2 miles in front of the enemy's lines.

On the morning of the 31st we formed; shortly after the enemy appeared in large force, both on our left, center, and right, evidently endeavoring to cut us off. The brigade of infantry to our left gave way, retreating in confusion through our lines, letting the whole force of the enemy's artillery, cavalry, and infantry fall upon us, which compelled us gradually to retire toward the main body of our army. The regiment covering the entire rear of the brigade, supporting one infantry regiment on our right, drove back, with heavy loss, a large force of cavalry which charged upon us, under cover of a piece of artillery, firing well-directed shells, which passed over us. The enemy being in such force, we had to retire about three-fourths of a mile, when an aide-de-camp of General McCook rode Up, informing us that the train close by was General McCook's entire ammunition train, which must be saved at all hazards; on intimation of which the regiment was immediately formed for its protection, holding the enemy in check until the entire train, with the exception of a few disabled wagons that could not be moved, was safely withdrawn. The regiment then moved between the enemy and train as far as the Murfreesborough pike, where we found the enemy making a fierce attack upon General Thomas' train, when we again repulsed them at several points, taking many prisoners and saving that entire portion of the train. The attack of the enemy was furious and desperate, which required the greatest firmness and bravery to resist. Colonel Kennett was an eye-witness to the determined bravery of a portion of the regiment rescuing the train from the enemy, which were in force at the hospital on the Murfreesborough pike. The regiment then formed in the field near the hospital, where the brigade soon assembled and reformed, and advanced toward the enemy's left. Soon came up to the enemy's cavalry, supported by artillery, when several other skirmishes ensued during the evening, the enemy's entire object seeming to be to take the train.

On the 1st instant, received orders to proceed to Nashville in charge of train, consisting of some 200 or 300 wagons. When about 2 miles on the Nashville side of La Vergne, we were attacked by General Wheeler's brigade of cavalry, which made several dashes on the train, and were repulsed. They then attacked our rear in force. After a well-contested fight, our regiment put them to flight in disorder, killing 9 of them and wounding several, and arrived in Nashville at 9 p.m. and encamped.

The 2d instant, remained in Nashville and procured forage for our horses, furnishing working party and escort to forage train.
The 3d instant, left Nashville for Murfreesborough in charge of hospital and ammunition trains. Attacked again in force by Wheeler's brigade of cavalry on the Nashville side of La Vergne, which was repulsed with a loss of 15 on their side and some 8 or 9 prisoners taken; among the latter the adjutant of the Third Alabama Cavalry. Two of our non-commissioned officers, I regret to inform you, were severely and dangerously wounded, whom we had to leave in a house on the roadside.
Arrived at camp, near Murfreesborough, at I a.m., 4th instant, with the train all safe, with the exception of one wagon of the regiment that was cut off by the enemy, and is now supposed to have returned to Nashville.

On the evening of the 4th, proceeded with brigade toward Murfreesborough as far as Stone's River, and returned to camp.
On the 5th instant, proceeded again with brigade to Murfreesborough, and beyond it about 4½ miles, where we halted, taking several prisoners, and returning to camp about 7 p.m.

I have much pleasure in informing you that the conduct and behavior of both officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates of the regiment have been highly creditable, with not a single instance to the contrary in the regiment.

Inclosed please find list of casualties that have occurred since December 26, 1862, to January 5, 1863.(*)
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. A. MURRAY,
Lieutenant-Colonel Third Ohio Cavalry, Comdg. Regiment.

 


 


 

Email From DC Caughey: From Heitman's "Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army" (1886), page 738:
Born in England, appointed an officer from the Army. Served as a private, corporal, and sergeant in Company F, 1st US Artillery from November 23, 1850 to March 23, 1855. Served as a private in Company F, 1st US Artillery and in General Service from October 7, 1856 to October 10, 1861. Appointed Lieutenant Colonel, 3rd Ohio Cavalry on October 10, 1861. resigned this position on June 7, 1863. In the meantime had been appointed a 2nd Lieutenant in the 4th US Cavalry in the regular army on July 17, 1862, but never served with the regiment. He resigned this commission on June 18, 1863.

I'll forward copies of his enlistment papers for each enlistment from ancestry.com, but here are the highlights:

1850:
Born Wickham, England. Age 27, blue eyes, brown hair, ruddy complexion, 5'9" tall. Occupation: clerk. Enlisted in New Orleans, Louisiana by Lieutenant David on November 23, 1850 into Company F, 1st U S Artillery. Discharged at Fort McIntosh, Texas at the expiration of his term of service as a sergeant on November 23, 1855.
1856:
Born Farsham (or Farnham) in Wickham, England. Age 33, grey eyes, brown hair, fair complexion, 5'8" tall. Occupation: soldier. Enlisted in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by Lieutenant Bootes on October 7, 1856 into Company F, 1st US Artillery. Discharged on August 7, 1861 upon his re-enlistment, no location or rank listed.
1861:
Born Wickham, England. Age 36, grey eyes, brown hair, ruddy complexion, 5'9" tall. Enlisted at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania by Captain Jonas P. Holliday of the 2nd US Cavalry on August 7, 1861 into service at the "Cavalry Depot." Discharged on october 11, 1861 by Special Order 267, Adjutant General's Office, dated October 3, 1861, at carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania as a sergeant.

 

5. Mary Ann BELTZHOOVER, daughter of Samuel BELTZHOOVER and Susan RHERER, was born on 15 October 1830 in Big Springs. Cumberland Co., PA, USA. She was christened "24/3/1833 or 35" in United Presbyterian Church, Big Spring, Cumberland Co., Pennsylvania. She married John Auguste SIMMS circa 1849 in Gillespie, Texas. She died after 1880.

 

According to the 1880 census, apparently she was living in "4th Ward,Carlisle, PA" as the Head of Household. Nothing about the children, though.

 

Douglas Alexander MURRAY and Mary Ann BELTZHOOVER had the following children:

 

James Patrick MURRAY (1856- ). James was born in 1856.

Catherine Beltzhoover MURRAY (1857- ). Catherine was born in 1857.

3

Elizabeth Rushworth MURRAY (1859-1949)

Susan Douglas MURRAY (1861- ). Susan was born in 1861.